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About Us

The Namgyal Institute of Tibetology was established in the year 1958. Located in Deorali, Gangtok, East Sikkim, the main building of the Institute is an imposing monument and a splendid example of Sikkimese architecture. The Namgyal Institute holds a museum, two libraries and a research centre. The 12th Chogyal (king) of Sikkim, Palden Thondup Namgyal, envisioned and helped established the Namgyal Institute as its Founder President. The site on which the Institute is established was donated by his father, the 11th Chogyal Tashi Namgyal, in memory of his departed son Paljor Namgyal.

The Institute’s foundation stone was laid by the 14th Dalai Lama on the 10th of February, 1957, and the Institute was declared open by the late Prime Minister of India Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru on the 1st of October, 1958.

The initial purpose of the Institute’s foundation was to preserve the invaluable texts on history, religion, literature and science brought from Tibet at the time of the region’s political turmoil in the 1950’s. The collection later expanded to includes thangkas, statues, xylographs, ritual instruments and other treasures.

The Namgyal Institute of Tibetology was established in the year 1958. Located in Deorali, Gangtok, East Sikkim, the main building of the Institute is an imposing monument and a splendid example of Sikkimese architecture. The Namgyal Institute holds a museum, two libraries and a research centre. The 12th Chogyal (king) of Sikkim, Palden Thondup Namgyal, envisioned and helped established the Namgyal Institute as its Founder President. The site on which the Institute is established was donated by his father, the 11th Chogyal Tashi Namgyal, in memory of his departed son Paljor Namgyal.

The Institute’s foundation stone was laid by the 14th Dalai Lama on the 10th of February, 1957, and the Institute was declared open by the late Prime Minister of India Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru on the 1st of October, 1958.

The initial purpose of the Institute’s foundation was to preserve the invaluable texts on history, religion, literature and science brought from Tibet at the time of the region’s political turmoil in the 1950’s. The collection later expanded to includes thangkas, statues, xylographs, ritual instruments and other treasures.

 

Since its inception, the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology sponsored and promoted research on Mahayana Buddhism, religious art and related fields, and more recently, on the Buddhist history, language and culture of Sikkim and other Himalayan regions.

The Institute holds two libraries. The Tibetan Library, which has one of the largest collections of Tibetan texts in the world, and the General Library, which holds an important collection of books, in English and other languages, on Buddhism and the Himalayan region. Everybody can access both libraries.  

The Museum holds an important collection of Mahayana Buddhist art in the form of thangkas (painted scrolls), statues, and ritual objects, in addition to rare Buddhist texts written in various languages and other antiques. The museum is open to the public.

In 2018, the Namgyal Institute of Tibetology established a department for the study of Tibetan Medicine (BSRMS), which is affiliated to the Central University of Sikkim. It is popularly known as ‘Sowa Rigpa’ or ‘Amji Course’. Sixty students have so far enrolled with the first class of 2018 currently in its internship year.

In 2019, the Institute initiated a two years Master’s program in Buddhist and Tibetan Studies. The first two classes of 2019 and 2020 have completed the program, which is also affiliated to the Central University of Sikkim.

A One-Day National Seminar

Sikkim Video Archive

Dec 22, 2023

A talk on Buddhism by Tulku Jamyang . Organized by: Namgyal Institute of Tibetology Gangtok Sikkim.

Jul 29, 2023

Mark Turin (PhD, Linguistics, Leiden University, 2006) is an anthropologist, linguist and occasional radio presenter...

Feb 22, 2022

Kunchok Lodroe, better known as Ajo Garpo, spent over 50 years of his life carving sacred Buddhist mantras on stones at Tashiding monastery, one of Sikkim’s most sacred locations...

Jul 15, 2022

Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991), one of the greatest realized masters of the 20th century, was tutor to the 14th Dalai Lama and to the Bhutanese Royal Family...

Jun 15, 2017

The Lhon Drokpas consist of 12 families of Tibetan yak herders settled in the upper reaches of the Lachen Valley where they have grazed their herds of yak...

Mar 9, 2017

Every winter, the Bumchu or ‘sacred water ritual’ of Tashiding is held on the full moon night of the first month of the lunar calendar, usually falling in February or early March.

Mar 8, 2017

Pang Lhabsol, Sikkim’s most important indigenous celebration, consists of a series of rituals and monastic dances held in honour of Sikkim’s chief mountain deity, Khangchendzonga, and all the land’s guardian deities...

Mar 8, 2017

Every winter, the lamas of Phensang’s village monastery hold their annual cham. These dramatic ritual masked dances impart elementary Buddhist teachings while providing entertainment to villagers. Their main purpose is to remove obstacles and ward off misfortune for the village,

Mar 8, 2017

Ritual Journeys is an intimate portrait of Merayk, an 80 years old Lepcha shaman or Padim. Merayk lives with his family in Dzongu, a Lepcha reserve in North Sikkim, Eastern Himalayas.

Mar 2, 2017

Ongdala is an eight year old tulku or reincarnate lama. The film follows his public examination which took place in the Sikkimese village of Lachen in January 2007.

Feb 28, 2017

Every winter, over a period of six days, the lamas of Lingthem’s village monastery hold their annual cham. These dramatic ritual masked dances impart elementary Buddhist teachings while providing entertainment to villagers.

Feb 25, 2017

The film illustrates the changes the Lepcha of the Dzongu reserve, North Sikkim, have been through in the last 60 years.